Stuart Thompson 13 February, 2017

Column CarReviews

In a global debut at CES, Honda unveiled its Riding Assist technology, which leverages Honda’s robotics technology to create a self-balancing motorcycle that greatly reduces the possibility of falling over while the motorcycle is at rest.

The global mobility company aintroduced Honda Riding Assist, a concept motorcycle that applies Honda’s robotics technology to maintain balance. Visitors to Honda’s exhibit (LVCC, North Hall – 7312) also can experience firsthand Honda robotics technology by “test-driving” the UNI-CUB, the company’s self-balancing personal mobility device.

“Since our founding, Honda has focused on creating technologies that help people,” said Yoshiyuki Matsumoto, president & CEO of Honda R&D Co., Ltd. “Our goal is to showcase a future technology path that results in a redefined mobility experience.”

In a global debut at CES, Honda unveiled its Riding Assist technology, which leverages Honda’s robotics technology to create a self-balancing motorcycle that greatly reduces the possibility of falling over while the motorcycle is at rest.Honda Riding Assist motorcycle
In a global debut at CES, Honda unveiled its Riding Assist technology, which leverages Honda’s robotics technology to create a self-balancing motorcycle that greatly reduces the possibility of falling over while the motorcycle is at rest.

Rather than relying on gyroscopes, which add a great deal of weight and alter the riding experience as announced by other companies, the Honda Riding Assist motorcycle incorporates technology originally developed for the company’s UNI-CUB personal mobility device.